Don't buy your fish from Whale killers

On October 17 th Iceland announced its resumption of commercial whaling. They claim whales are a threat to fishstocks and must be culled. There is no scientific credibility to this argument. Human over-fishing is to blame for dwindling stocks and catches, and this in turn is a threat to whales and the entire ocean ecosystem.

Campaign Whale is leading a coalition of anti-whaling groups calling on fish retailers in the UK, EU and USA, to review their fish purchases of Icelandic seafood. The Icelandic Prime Minister has recently hinted that whaling could stop for ''economic'' and other reasons. With Icelandic elections due early in May it is vital that we keep up the pressure and demonstrate to Iceland that whales are worth far more alive than dead, and that whaling is bad for business.

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Help Stop Iceland's Whale Killers

In 2003, Iceland announced plans to kill 500 fin, sei and minke whales over two years for so-called ‘research’. In October 2006, Iceland announced the resumption of commercial whaling .

As of January 2007, Icelandic whalers have killed 7 endangered fin whales and a minke whale. They plan to kill a further 2 fin and 69 minkes this year, for profit. Iceland, like Norway, claim whales must be culled because they eat fish. This is nonsense. Human over-fishing is destroying fish stocks, not whales.

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Whaling Ban Under Threat

Norwegian Whaler & Harpoon The International Whaling Commission (IWC) is currently finalising a Revised Management Scheme (RMS) for the resumption of commercial whaling. Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Switzerland and the Netherlands are some of the countries backing the RMS and the resumption of commercial whaling. Many other countries may do the the same.

Campaign Whale believes the world''s surviving whale populations are under threat as never before from climate change, pollution, entanglement in fishing nets and other threats. We also believe that killing whales is both cruel and totally unnecessary in a modern world. Whales need protecting, not hunting. If you agree please help us save the whaling ban.

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Shell Shocker

The very survival of a critically endangered whale population is in the hands of the oil giants Shell, and we need your help to save it.

The western Pacific gray whales cling to survival with only around 100 animals left. They breed, every summer, off the northwest tip of Sakhalin Island off Russia’s far East coast. Now, these whales face certain disaster if Royal Dutch Shell’s plans to drill for oil and gas in their breeding grounds get the necessary financial backing from the European Bank. Royal Dutch Shell’s Sakhalin II project is the largest integrated oil and gas project in the world, and it is seeking up to $300 million in public financing from the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD).

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The Dall's Porpoise Disaster

Japanese coastal fishermen kill around 20,000 dolphins, porpoises, pilot and beaked whales each year. However, since the IWC ban on whaling, one species, the Dall''s porpoise, has been the principle target of Japanese hunters.

The IWC''s Scientific Committee has repeatedly voiced concern that the Dall’s porpoise hunt is unsustainable. In 1990, the IWC passed a resolution calling on Japan to reduce the kill to at least pre-1986 levels, or between 8-10,000 per year. Although Japan introduced restrictions to reduce the kill, it quickly increased and remains to this day around double the recommendations made at that time. Approaching half a million Dalls porpoises have been slaughtered since commercial whaling was banned in 1986. This year a further 18,000 will be harpooned by Japanese fishermen as they bow-ride the hunting boats.

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The whales still need you

Over 25,000 whales have been slaughtered since a ban on commercial whaling was introduced in 1986. Norway, Iceland and Japan will kill over 2,000 whales this year between them by exploiting loopholes in the ban. Sadly, world goverrnments are not prepared to take any meaningful action that will stop this outrage and every year the whalers kill more whales.

The International Whaling Commission (IWC), the UN recognised management body for whaling, has failed to stop the killing and now a compromise deal may lift the ban  altogether condemning many thousands more whales to a cruel death.

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The Faroes cruel whale slaughter

The Faroes cruel whale slaughter

Every year around 2,000 whales are driven ashore and cruelly slaughtered in the Faroe Islands, mid-way between the Shetland Islands and Iceland. For centuries the Faroe Islanders have hunted pilot whales, driving entire schools into killing bays, where they are speared or gaffed from boats, dragged ashore and butchered with knives. Although the Islands are a protectorate of Denmark, they have their own Government and regulations governing the pilot whale hunt or "grind" as it is known.

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